Liz Chappie-Zoller

Born of Fire

2-D Mixed Media on Canvas, 36 x 36″

This is a Unique Work

$2,150

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More about Born of Fire

Born of Fire was inspired by an Indian Relay racehorse coming in “hot”to the pit in which its rider vaults from its back onto the back of the next relay horse. The meaning of the paint colors and war paint symbols is:

  • Red symbolizes war, blood, strength, energy, and power.
  • Blue symbolizes wisdom and confidence.
  • Hoof prints indicate the number of horses captured in raids.
  • Lightning bolts ask for speed for the horse.
  • Hailstones are a prayer for hail to fall on the warrior’s enemy.
  • Bands across the nose indicate battles won.

Why Paint Horses?
When the Native Americans painted symbols on their horses, they weren’t doing it just to make their animals look attractive. Each symbol had a different meaning, and many of them were meant to help the horse in battle/hunting etc. The symbols often had magical or spiritual significance.

There are many reasons why Native American tribes painted symbols on their horses. The most common reason is warfare. The horses would be painted before battle with symbols to make them faster, stronger, braver etc, and they would be painted after battle to show their rider’s victory/defeat, where the horse was wounded, how many enemies were killed etc.

But war isn’t the only reason they painted their horses. Some horses were painted with medicine symbols. Others were used for hunting, so they were decorated with symbols to ensure a successful hunt.

Gallery wrap
Total Dimensions: 36 x 36 x 2″


Artist

Liz Chappie-Zoller


Liz Chappie-Zoller

Liz Chappie-Zoller is a contemporary artist whose paintings are a unique combination of working horses and graffiti, directly inspired by her rural Montana landscape. Emphasizing the strength and vitality of traditional rural ranch, rodeo, and Indian Relay racehorses mashed up with the colorful energy of urban graffiti artists, her art challenges our assumptions about diverse cultures as it explores their overlapping edges.

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